True Issue 5

by True

€24.00

True is a photography journal that showcases the unpublished personal projects of established and emerging photographers.

Unconstrained by commercial focus, it sets different parameters for the creative conversation between publication and contributor.

True issue 5 takes us on a tour of continents: from Africa to Europe and across to North America. On the way we’re introduced to individuals, families, their communities and homes.

The issue’s diverse group of contributors capture this theme of ‘people and place’ through a variety of lenses: Lea Colombo’s vivid ‘Seven Chakras of South Africa’ shows the people she met during a road trip along the Eastern Cape of her home country in 2016. Pieter Hugo presents an intimate series of family portraits from his archive, entitled ‘Family’. The images, taken in Africa and Europe over the course of a decade, provide glimpses into different family environments that at points feel familiar and at others entirely unknown. Elsewhere Gregory Halpern’s story, ‘Revisiting Omaha’, introduces the communities he met during a residency at the city’s Bemis Center in 2005. Gregory recalls this as an important and foundational period in the development of his photographic style and approach.

The universal theme continues in Nick Haymes’ ongoing documentary of Bailey and her circle of friends at the Savage Ranch artistic community in Temecula, California. And in Sam Rock’s photographic essay created during the 2017 French Tennis Open, where he captures the congregation of spectators that share his love of the sport.

Elsewhere in the issue are stories created in collaboration: Bibi Cornejo Borthwick and her father Mark Borthwick stage a fashion show on the streets of Brooklyn. While Benedict Brink’s experimental project with set designer Mila Taylor Young and model Yasmine Moon explores form and femininity.

Chris Rhodes curates a selection of accidental images, out of focus subjects and frames shot solely to finish rolls of film.

And artists Theo Simpson and David Noonan individually present exclusive mixed-media stories that challenge the format of a photo essay.